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How The British SAS Released Hostages

How The British SAS Released Hostages

The Special Air Service, or SAS for short, is a particular unit of the British Army. The Brits put it together during World War II. The founder was the Scottish Lieutenant Colonel David Stirling. You can find them in Credenhill near Hereford. The SAS operates worldwide. Experts consider them to be one of the most experienced special forces in the world. At the same time, it is one of the oldest units of this military kind.

Operations

The main task of the SAS is to collect information about the enemy. It is, therefore, mainly active in military reconnaissance. Simultaneously, the particular unit carries out sabotage operations behind enemy lines, marks targets for fire and frees captured soldiers and civilians. But that does not include the tasks of the SAS. It also operates as an anti-terrorist unit domestically. Here she acts in the liberation of hostages and is used for the targeted killing of enemies of the state. If necessary, the SAS works covertly so that the involvement of its government is not apparent. It also protects senior British officials. The SAS motto is: Who dares wins.

Operations
Operations

Around 20 years ago, the particular unit put its skills to the test on a mission in Africa. Armed militia captured a total of 11 British soldiers in Sierra Leone. Their liberation became an impressive demonstration of the SAS in the fight against terrorism. Fifteen days after the capture, the SAS stepped in and freed the soldiers. The 600 West Side Boys fighters had been terrorizing the region for a long time. They captured British rangers on patrol. The terrorists’ demands were extensive. Their leader demanded an amnesty and the immediate evacuation of the country by UN troops. At the same time, he wanted to become president. Scotland Yard started negotiations with the kidnappers, but at the same time, the SAS was preparing a rescue operation. It is not for nothing that the specialists are considered the fathers of all modern command units.

At that time, a total of 50 SAS men and 150 paratroopers got ready. First, the negotiators from Scotland Yard managed to free five hostages. In return, they delivered drugs to the kidnappers. But one of the liberated soldiers was able to pass the officials a card from the rebel camp. That enabled the SAS to come up unnoticed. The British Prime Minister approved the action. The action started perfectly because the Islamic West Side Boys were unexpectedly foggy with alcohol and drugs and did not notice the approach of a transport helicopter.

The actual liberation then turned out to be easier than expected. Numerous kidnappers fled into the jungle or defended themselves in an uncoordinated manner. While the SAS freed the remaining hostages, the military held the rest of the rebels in check. They managed to wipe out the terrorists almost wholly. The leader was arrested and later sentenced to 50 years in prison. The operation is considered a milestone in the fight against terrorism. A new unit, the Special Forces Support Group, emerged from the cooperation of various task forces.